Rudolf Weishappel
Registered as:
Instrument: violin, piano

Weishappel Rudolf

General Information

Year of Birth:  1921
Date of Birth:  25. March 1921
Place of Birth:  Graz
Region of Birth: 
Country of Birth: 
Date of Death:  2. January 2006
Nationality: 

Education

PeriodEducationInstrumentTeacherEducation OrganisationLocation
1929

violin lessons

1933

piano lessons

1938

lessons in theory and composition (Robert Wagner)

1939

school leaving examination

1939 - 1941

english studies

1939 - 1941

german studies

1939 - 1941

musicology

Activities

PeriodActivityOrganisationLocation
1945 - 1952

Kleine Zeitung: freelance employee

1945 - 1952

Wahrheit: freelance employee

1945 - 1952

freelance composer

1945 - 1952

numerous commissions by Alpenland

1945 - 1952

numerous commissions

1952 - 1954

culture correspondent for Alpenland

1954 - 1958

Neuer Kurier: freelance as a music, theater, and film critic

1959

culture editor

1961 - 1973

manager of film and television

1963 - 1972

design of television broadcasting series

1974 - 1986

head of theater, film and music

Commissions (Selection)

PeriodCommissionCompositionCommissioner (Organisation)Commissioner (Person)

commissions by Alpenland

Awards

PeriodAwardCompositionAwarding Organisation
1958

promotional award

1968

promotional award

1972

award

1974

granting of professorship

1987

gold order of merit

Description of Style

I'm not a dogmatist. I am mainly compelled to the free tonality, but I sometimes include - depending on if it is required by the text or dramatic situation - the twelve-tone technique in my works. Here a quote by Helmuth A. Fiechtner in the "Furche" 1969 for the cantata 'Von der ungeordneten Verlassenschaft': "Above all, Rudolf Weishappel's cantata, which uses the twelve-tone technique unorthodoxly, will be a timelessly valid, independent work for many years." I am dogmatic in only one point: Music for me is a sensual art, created to be perceived by the ear. In other words: construction, form and message of a musical work must be heard and should not only be readable.

Rudolf Weishappel, 1994